Blog Bling and Creative Commons

 

 

Want some photos, clip art, videos, music, sounds, polls, inframe-content or other bling on your blog? Not sure where to find it and if you can legally use it?

The Commons

Last week, I attended the CEATCA 2012 Teachers’ Convention. And, like the last one, I left with some information to share.

 

 

The convention this year had a couple of Creative Commons PD sessions. I am a strong advocate of respecting copyright and attribution. This is largely because I am a teacher and I want my students growing up mindful of and reverent to their own and others’ thoughts, actions and creations. I also am an artist and writer and care about others’ intellectual and artistic properties.

Pete MacKay of 2Learn.ca, in his CEATCA Convention PD session, A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words But Is It Free To Use?, summarized the Creative Commons, public domain, Copyright Zero and copyright licenses and how they should be dealt with. There were a few points that I would like to share with you.

  1. These licenses apply to everything. If you didn’t make it, someone else owns it and you need to determine how you can use it. In Canada, according to Pete, fair use is no longer in effect. It never was like fair dealing in the U.S., but now we don’t even have it. I am not sure how I feel about that. It will have severe repercussions in areas of research.
  2. Even if you get permission to use material, the creator still retains his or her rights. You do not own it. Yeah, old news, but news that is often forgotten.
  3. You do not have the right to broadcast what you purchase or what you get through Creative Commons. This includes mood music before a presentation. This is not news, but it is worth rementioning. (By the way, I now have permission to use all parts of that 50 second video.)
  4. Share-alike means if you use somebody else’s work as a part of something you make, what you make must also be share-alike. You can not copyright your work while it contains share-alike components. This is an interesting slant on what I understood share-alike to mean.
  5. If you play music over an image that is protected by no-derivatives, you are breaking the law. But if you insert that image into a silent slideshow and in no other way alter the image, you are not. Okay! That one still baffles me.
  6. Any looser license you apply to any of your work, such a Copyright Zero, is irrevocable due to the grandfathering effect.
  7. YouTube has a three strike policy. First strike, you get a notice, but you don’t have to do anything. Second strike, you have an ad place over your video (but these can be closed anyway). Third strike, you are “encouraged” to buy iTunes. There is a fourth strike somewhere in there too: you have to watch a copyright video. (This information was provided by Dave Mitchell, who discussed copyright in relation to YouTube in another PD session of the convention1.)
  8. To quote Creative Commons Search, “Do not assume that the results displayed in this search portal are under a CC license. You should always verify that the work is actually under a CC license by following the link.” In short, trust only the raw source of the material.
  9. If you want to discover how an image is licensed, you can reverse search it.
  10. You can also cite material properly in current APA and MLA format.

So, bottom line, why should your students and you adhere to copyright laws? Well, how would you feel if someone took credit for your thoughts and work? And what if the material you are proudly exhibiting on your site was stolen by the person you got it from? Who gets the blame? Copyright protects and respects everyone, including you.

The Bling

The PD sessions on copyright that I attended at this year’s convention inspired me to publish and share my go-to image-and-media resource page with you.

 

 

This list of 150+ search engines, tools, resources and licensing explanations for enhancing your posts and adding that deeper dimension to your content is where I go when I create media on my blog. I offer it openly in hopes that you find it useful in your image and multimedia adventures. Just respect the copyright wildlife and you will do well.

 

1 Dave mentioned that SMARTboard Notebook prefers YouTube formats of WebM and FLV, while MP4 and divx are better for clipping and editting. In addition, he suggested using KeepVid to download YouTube videos to your desktop so you can ensure their use in class. When using KeepVid, do not push any of the shiny red buttons beneath the URL box (your mother warned you about shiny red berries, right? White ones are occasionally bad for you too.). Instead, use the small blue download button beside the URL box. No need to pay for a free service, is there?

Have fun with the resources.

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3 thoughts on “Blog Bling and Creative Commons

  1. I think this is one of the most vital info for me. And i’m glad reading your article. The web site style is perfect, the articles is really nice :D. Good job, cheers.

    • Thank you for the compliments, Terisa. I am glad you found the resources useful. I realize the list is not exhaustive, but I hope its scope is wide enough to benefit most people.

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